How do you use social media to define yourself?

Sociologists are experimenting with the concept of “social media” to redefine who we are and what we are supposed to do.

It is an evolving and complex field of study that has sparked controversy and raised questions about the role of technology in our lives.

Some social media users are questioning the legitimacy of “identity”, while others are concerned about the impact of the digital revolution on privacy and civil liberties.

We asked five sociologists to explore what “identify” is and what does it mean to “identifies” today.

Anomie sociologist Anurag Gautam said the term is anachronistic.

“What’s going on now is a very much cultural revolution,” he told Al Jazeera.

‘Socially awkward’ ‘I have not been using social media for a while’ – Anuradha Agrawal, anomies sociology, positivism In a time when “identifying” is increasingly used as an identity marker, many social media “identifiers” seem socially awkward. “

The problem is, we’re using a term that is not very useful anymore.”

‘Socially awkward’ ‘I have not been using social media for a while’ – Anuradha Agrawal, anomies sociology, positivism In a time when “identifying” is increasingly used as an identity marker, many social media “identifiers” seem socially awkward.

They are more likely to be male, heterosexual and young, and have poor social skills.

They do not have a social circle and lack the social capital to connect with others, according to the University of Melbourne’s Gautama Dasgupta.

“It’s very social awkward for them,” he said.

You need a social life to be social, but social life is not something you learn on social media.” “

And that’s not even something they are taught.

You need a social life to be social, but social life is not something you learn on social media.”

Dr Dasgupta said social media platforms were creating a generation of “nones” and a “nastier” generation of people who would rather be “socially inauthentic” than be “authentic”.

“Social media is taking the place of a more authentic and authentic kind of life,” he explained.

“But social media is creating a very different kind of world, one that is socially awkward, where you are socialising with people who are not you.”‘

I’ve never been on a Facebook’ Anomies sociologist, Anurarag Gault, says he has not been on Facebook for “a while”.

“I have never been using it as a social media platform.

I’ve never even been in a Facebook group.”

Anomys sociologist and writer Anurash Gautami said she found the term “social network” too “stereotypical”.

“We have all become socially awkward in our daily lives, because of social media,” she told Aljazeera.

“So I have never found it useful.”

Dr Gault said she felt like a social networking pioneer because she has been “on Facebook for years” and has not used social media as a tool to “be more authentic”.

“It doesn’t really work for me,” she said.

Dr Dasgpta, the University’s Gault and Gautamy said “identification” was a very useful term that could be applied to all kinds of people.

“If you are not on Facebook, you are on a website that is designed to give you that experience, but it is not real life,” she added.

‘A new form of identity’ Anamia sociologist Akshay Sood said the definition of “personality” is changing rapidly, with a number of factors including “technology, social media, and digitalisation” contributing to the shift. “

People should be able to find their identity on a social platform, not on a phone.”

‘A new form of identity’ Anamia sociologist Akshay Sood said the definition of “personality” is changing rapidly, with a number of factors including “technology, social media, and digitalisation” contributing to the shift.

“A person is more and more defined by what they can do, not what they are,” he added.

Anamias sociologist said that the term was becoming increasingly obsolete and people were trying to find “new forms of identity”.

“The term ‘personality’ is a great idea but it has been hijacked by people who use the term as an excuse for social isolation,” he argued.

‘People are trying to ‘be authentic’ to fit in’ An Amia sociological researcher Anuram Gautamed said social networking platforms were not just providing social support. “

Now, the definition is more about being socially awkward than being authentic.”

‘People are trying to ‘be authentic’ to fit in’ An Amia sociological researcher Anuram Gautamed said social networking platforms were not just providing social support.

“There is an increasing pressure on social networks to be ‘authentic’, because the demand for social connections is increasing,” she explained.

However, “authenticity” was not just about connecting online.

“Social networks are also